In the version we have of Damascius’ work, Cyril is a jealous instigator of murder and the men who did the deed “laid upon the city the heaviest blood-guilt and the greatest disgrace.” What is unique about the work is the insight into Hypatia’s feelings via the menstrual rag anecdote. Another four letters mention her. This affair brought not the least opprobrium, not only upon Cyril, but also upon the whole Alexandrian church. There he met and became great friends with Isidore and later wrote his biography which contains a short piece on Hypatia. He tells us, in his preface, that his teachers were the pagan grammarians Helladius and Ammonius who came to Constantinople, fleeing the 391 destruction of the Serapeum in Alexandria. He wrote the book while living in Alexandria and had access to any generally known stories about Hypatia, which might have provided the new anecdote. Philosophy soon caught his attention and he studied under Hermias and his sons. What comes down to us is similar to the story given by Socrates Scholasticus—Hypatia is a learned woman, esteemed for her knowledge and behavior—but Damascius leaves out the political overtones leading up to her death. Hier sollte eine Beschreibung angezeigt werden, diese Seite lässt dies jedoch nicht zu. Thus she came to be widely and deeply trusted throughout the city, accorded welcome and addressed with honor. I hope this essay contributes some additional knowledge to those who, like me, are fascinated by the life and death of this remarkable woman. After tearing her body in pieces, they took her mangled limbs to a place called Cinaron, and there burnt them. Posted in History, Hypatia, Wonderful Women | Tagged damascius, hypatia, john of nikiu, primary sources, socrates scholasticus, synesius | 11 Comments. Designed by Elegant Themes | Powered by WordPress, As a favor to my readers and Hypatia fans, I put all the material in one place. Check it out and let me know what you think! Hypatia of Alexandria. The letters of Synesius, Bishop of Ptolemais, Synesius (b. We could have had a cure for cancer and cities on Mars by now. He attributes Hypatia’s murder directly to her involvement in these disputes. Her silence obviously broke his heart, but his final letter to her still expressed love and admiration for his “mother, sister, teacher, and withal benefactress.” He died in 413, two years before his adored teacher. Sign up  for my newsletter below in the footer and get Angel of the Marshes — a prequel/short story from my Theodosian Women series — in your choice of eBook formats. 3. The Chronicle comes to us by a convoluted route. I just got the Kindle version of Selene of Alexandria. He recommends his friends (possibly relatives) and asks her to see to their well-being. We have access to several of his speeches, essays, hymns, homilies, and 159 letters. The oldest accounts of Hypatia come to us from either the Suda (or Suidae) Lexicon or from the writings of the early Christian Church. As a favor to my readers and Hypatia fans, I put all the material in one place. This information gave his heart such a prick that he at once plotted her murder…. Professor Michael A. I think society needs to be more aware of women especially in science. We don’t have access to the original, but several scholars over the years have tried to reconstruct Damascius’ narrative using those and other extant materials. Only a few pages come down to us from those times and almost none can be attributed to Hypatia, except a couple of technical works on mathematics and astronomy. 87-103). As a favor to my readers and Hypatia fans, I put all the material in one place. Thanks for checking out my blog. And the governor of the city honored her exceedingly; for she had beguiled him through her magic. John of Nikiu stands alone in his condemnation of Hypatia’s actions and approval of her murder, but his basic narrative differs little from Socrates and Damascius. Philosophy soon caught his attention and he studied under Hermias and his sons. Damascius wrote his book on Isidore while living in Alexandria and had access to any generally known stories about Hypatia, which might have provided the new anecdote. John of Nikiu stands alone in his condemnation of Hypatia’s actions and approval of her murder, but his basic narrative differs little from Socrates and Damascius. Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in: You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. 458, d. 540), also known as “the last of the Neoplatonists” was a pagan philosopher and the last head of the School of Athens, which Emperor Justinian closed in 529.

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