Stack the wrapped sweet potatoes in a cardboard or wooden box of your choosing (or one that allows aeration), without a lid, and place it in a basement or … Every day at wikiHow, we work hard to give you access to instructions and information that will help you live a better life, whether it's keeping you safer, healthier, or improving your well-being. After the curing process is done, then you store your sweet potatoes in an area that is kept around 55-60°F for about 6-8 more weeks. This image may not be used by other entities without the express written consent of wikiHow, Inc.
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\u00a9 2020 wikiHow, Inc. All rights reserved. This is so the curing process can finish. This image may not be used by other entities without the express written consent of wikiHow, Inc.
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\u00a9 2020 wikiHow, Inc. All rights reserved. Please help us continue to provide you with our trusted how-to guides and videos for free by whitelisting wikiHow on your ad blocker. wikiHow's Content Management Team carefully monitors the work from our editorial staff to ensure that each article is backed by trusted research and meets our high quality standards. I’m not sure how many pounds I had that first year, but they kept for several months, almost until our fall harvest. If you want to use your sweet potatoes more quickly, you can skip this step and eat them right after removing them from the humidity. This image is not<\/b> licensed under the Creative Commons license applied to text content and some other images posted to the wikiHow website. The wikiHow Video Team also followed the article's instructions and verified that they work. Discard these to prevent them from causing the others to spoil faster. Once your sweet potatoes are done curing, store them in a cool, dry pantry—not the refrigerator! wikiHow, Inc. is the copyright holder of this image under U.S. and international copyright laws. If you really can’t stand to see another ad again, then please consider supporting our work with a contribution to wikiHow. If you've ever eaten a sweet potato immediately after harvesting it, you know that the results can be disappointingly flavorless and overly starchy. We use cookies to make wikiHow great. They require a long growing season, but will reward you greatly for your patience. wikiHow, Inc. is the copyright holder of this image under U.S. and international copyright laws. We know ads can be annoying, but they’re what allow us to make all of wikiHow available for free. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/e\/e3\/Cure-Sweet-Potatoes-Step-1-Version-4.jpg\/v4-460px-Cure-Sweet-Potatoes-Step-1-Version-4.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/e\/e3\/Cure-Sweet-Potatoes-Step-1-Version-4.jpg\/aid11128065-v4-728px-Cure-Sweet-Potatoes-Step-1-Version-4.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":259,"bigWidth":"728","bigHeight":"410","licensing":"

\u00a9 2020 wikiHow, Inc. All rights reserved. To help increase their sweetness, place harvested sweet potatoes in a dark, warm room for at least two weeks before eating. While you could grow sweet potatoes slips yourself, it is always a good idea to start out with certified disease-free plants or vine cuttings from a reputable garden supply. If your sweet potatoes are damp when you dig them up (due to a recent rain or watering), be sure to dry them thoroughly before curing. 'Centennial' and 'Beauregard' are two varieties that grow well in Florida gardens. wikiHow, Inc. is the copyright holder of this image under U.S. and international copyright laws. Unless you own a space heater specifically designed for use in bathrooms, be careful to avoid getting the space heater itself wet. If some sweet potatoes remain tender after the rest have finished, this means they have not cured properly. Their flesh can be yellow, orange, or even purple. Sweet potatoes are typically started from transplants called "slips." And remember, while the word "yam" is sometimes used to describe the sweet potato, a true yam comes from a totally different plant. This allows some of the starch in the roots to convert to sugar. After letting them cure in the garage for a week (see instructions below), here’s what I did: I placed them only one layer deep in shallow plastic bins and placed the bins directly on the pantry floor. If there are any soft ones, these should be tossed out. Instead of a box, you can also use an insulated cooler bag to help create humidity. As the potatoes cure, they will become sweeter to the taste. They grow well in sandy soil and don't require much fertilizing. Once your sweet potatoes are done curing, store them in a cool, dry pantry—not the refrigerator! Nematodes can sometimes be a problem in Florida, so consider having your soil tested before you plant. Don't have a basement? Don't worry about fully cleaning your sweet potatoes: you can do that after the curing process when their skins are thicker. Include your email address to get a message when this question is answered. Remove the sweet potatoes from the warm, humid room and take them out of their bags or boxes. Sweet potato weevils can be a serious problem and starting out with certified-free transplants can help you avoid issues. wikiHow, Inc. is the copyright holder of this image under U.S. and international copyright laws. Sweet potatoes can be planted in the spring through the end of June. This image is not<\/b> licensed under the Creative Commons license applied to text content and some other images posted to the wikiHow website. This image may not be used by other entities without the express written consent of wikiHow, Inc.
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